UPDATE: Both the U.S. House and Senate have passed versions of the military spending bill including provisions to phase out PFAS-containing firefighting foam, but with different timelines. The bill now heads to a conference committee. 

The use of PFAS chemicals in firefighting foam is a major source of drinking water contamination, with PFAS chemicals contaminating the water of at least 1 in 20 Americans. A large amount of this contamination comes from military bases across the country.

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The dangerous class of nonstick chemicals called “PFAS” contaminates drinking water, communities, and people across the United States. One of the culprits: PFAS put into firefighting foams used at airports as required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The FAA requirement means that these foams remain a big concern when it comes to PFAS pollution, unnecessarily exposing communities and firefighters to the dangerous chemicals.

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Conference participants watch testing of PFAS-free firefighting foams

Toxic-Free Future’s Science Director, Erika Schreder, recently traveled to a conference in Dallas to gain more expertise on firefighting foams. She wanted to find out how well PFAS-free foams perform as we work with airports and refineries to stop the use of PFAS-containing foams. This research is critical as states and the Federal Aviation Administration consider restrictions on PFAS containing foams. Continue reading 

An important new article from Sharon Lerner in The Intercept highlights the health and environmental problems of newer generation PFAS chemicals used in certain firefighting foams. It uncovers the chemical industry’s dubious claims of safety and efficacy of these foams and why PFAS-free foams could be the better choice. Continue reading