Starbucks commits to eliminating PFAS from all U.S. packaging by the end of 2022, and international packaging in 2023

Toxic-Free Future and its Mind the Store program applaud this commitment and urge Congress to pass ban on PFAS in food packaging

SEATTLE, WA—On March 15, 2022, international coffee giant Starbucks announced its first-ever commitment to eliminate toxic PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) in its food packaging materials. As part of the company’s new sustainable packaging policy, the transition away from these dangerous chemicals in its food packaging materials will be complete in the U.S. by the end of 2022. Starbucks has more than 15,000 U.S. stores and 34,000 stores worldwide and is the second biggest quick-service restaurant chain in the U.S.

Continue reading 

Toxic-Free Future urges Congress to act soon to ban PFAS in food packaging and for retailers to commit to ending use

SEATTLE, WA—A new investigation released today by Consumer Reports found toxic “forever chemicals” appear to be widespread in packaging they tested from chain restaurants and grocery stores. According to Consumer Reports PFAS ‘forever chemicals’ were found in bowls, bags, plates, and wrappers.”

Continue reading 

Restaurant Brands International commits to eliminating PFAS in food packaging by 2025 in all stores worldwide including Burger King, Tim Hortons, and Popeyes

Health advocates applaud commitment and urge Congress to pass federal ban on PFAS in food packaging

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, Restaurant Brands International (RBI) announced that it will ban toxic PFAS “forever chemicals” in food packaging globally by 2025. RBI—which owns Burger King, Popeyes, and Tim Hortons—is one of the world’s largest quick service restaurant companies with 27,000 restaurants in more than 100 countries.

Continue reading 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jaime Smith, (253) 334-5670, jaime@gritcitystrategy.com 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Fast-casual chain Sweetgreen has announced it is phasing out per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in its bowls by the end of this year. The company is working with the packaging company Footprint on an alternative that it has already begun to roll out in some stores.

Continue reading